Author Topic: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame  (Read 976 times)

corlett

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Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« on: March 09, 2018, 08:02:35 AM »
This just removes a couple of keystrokes

I work with big 3D drawings a lot.  Select - add handle - move - all day long.

Problem is you often put the handle in the wrong place because of hidden lines.  So you go Hide / wire frame / add the handle / Hide /. 
Not an issue only the buttons are small and you have to say 'Yes' to "Wireframe"  I know its only 3 buttons but as the day drags on it starts to grind.

How about a toggle key which just blinks wire/hide/wire assign it to '\'  which is nice and close to my left hand.

Enjoy, Clive

PS you will need a Blink.dat file to start the ball rolling, it can be blank to start.



File$ = SYS$(23)+"\Blink.DAT"

OPEN "I", 1, File$              ' open file
Input #1,IBlink                '
CLOSE #1                        ' close the file

IF IBlink = 1.0 Then Goto Hide
IF IBlink = 0.0 Then Goto Wire

End

Wire:
>ID_GL_WIREFRAME_MODE
{
  }
OPEN "O", 1, File$              ' open file
IBlink = 1.0
Print #1,IBlink                '
CLOSE #1                        ' close the file
End

Hide:
>ID_GL_QUICK_HIDDENLINE_MODE
{
  }
OPEN "O", 1, File$              ' open file#
IBlink = 0.0
Print #1,IBlink                '
CLOSE #1                        ' close the file
End

PPS From the SDK
{ Sys$23 - Default macro directory. Terminate the desired directory with a backslash '\'. Example: }
{ Sys(23) = "C:\Program Files\Addons\DrollTroll's Macro Tools\"  }

Lar

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2018, 06:19:20 AM »

I use F6, F7 and F8 for wireframe, hide and shade and using them to toggle through the 3 modes has been great for me thus far, except that now'a days these programmers feel control of media files is more important than getting work done so by default you have to hold  the Fn key to get at the F keys. You can change the default use to the F keys but you have to do it through the bios, and opening the bios is a hit or miss process. However, once over these hurdles it easy sailing from there.


F6, 7 and 8 must be built in keys because they wire/hide/shade without opening any dialog boxes. They just use whatever the last setup  is, which is good for avoiding that 'ok' for wireframe and
especially since
now dc2018 shading dialog can't remember when the new mixed mode shading was the last thing used, but F8 does. However, if Normals was your last shading mode pressing F8 would do the legacy outline-less shading so to get back to normals or mixed mode you would have to go through the dialog by clicking the button or using the menu).


Lar


adriank

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2018, 08:48:31 PM »
I can appreciate Corlett's motivation to find a quick way to toggle between render settings - now that he's pointed it out it is indeed frustrating to toggle back & forth between wireframe & rendered.
Until I read Lar's response I'd never thought to assign keyboard shortcuts. I do still have a few vacancies on my keyboard so I tried assigning 7, 8 & 9 (steer clear of Lar's function key minefield) and it seems to work very well.
No need move the mouse to the menu or to click ok.

One thing that confuses is the menu for key assignments because all the shading options are duplicated. (shaded yellow in the attached) I haven't figured out why yet but I think the first set may be 'current view' and the second set 'all views' but it does not specify.
I've also not figured out yet the difference between flat shading mode and smooth shading mode (the keystroke shortcut seems to go to the last setting in shaded mode) or 'hidden line' and 'quick hidden line' modes.

Adrian

corlett

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2018, 03:37:41 AM »
Hi Lar

I chose '\' because its one of the few keys I have left.
F6 F7 F8  (inc shifts) I have assigned to Line type-layer-colour presets.
F7 is chain bot line one level 2 in gray.  It helps give my drawing a standardised look.
F9 F10 F11 F12 (inc shifts)are used for dimensioning and all my numbers are used up too.

Clive

PS
Just going off topic for a moment but to underline useful little tools under one keyboard button,
I have this under F10 (I put the current text size in TSize.Dat which all arrows and dimensions refer to)
This makes a nice ISO bi-lateral tolerance dimension.

File$ = SYS$(23)+"\TSize.DAT"
' MESSAGE "Filename:", File$
OPEN "I", 1, File$              ' open file
Input  #1,TSize                   '
CLOSE #1                        ' close the file

>Dimension
{
  <Color 0,0,0
  <Layer 1
  <Axis 0
  <Orientation 0
  <Precision 1
  <Format 0
  <Location 1
  <ToleranceType 2
  <ToleranceSize 0.8
  <ToleranceLow -0.001
  <ToleranceHigh +0.001
  <Tolerance 0.001

 <Suffix 5
 <Prefix 1

  <Font "MS PGothic"
  <VectorFont "Simplex_Win"
  <FontType 0
  <Size [TSize]
  <Style 0
  <Type 0
  <Fix 0
  <Gap [TSize/2]
  <Length 2.000000000000000e+000
  <OverShoot [TSize/3]
  <Arrowhead 4
  <Arrowhead2 4
  <EnableSecondArrow 0
  <DimUnits 0
  <DimEnableTextInsidePos 0
  <ArrowSize [TSize]
  <OptDimTextOffset [TSize/2]
  <DimHorizontalTextPos 0
  <DimMovement 0
  <LinePosition 0
  <Multiplier 1.000000
  <Associated 0
  <ForceTextHorizontallyOutside 0
  <TextMovement 0

  }

>text
{
<Font "Arial"
<DrawAs2DText
<Null
}

Lar

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2018, 07:20:28 AM »


I chose '\' because its one of the few keys I have left.

Yeah, most of my keys are used up too, except in combination with the control keys, cus I hate having to press them too. I am only now venturing into the control key territory. In fact, some of my straight keys are taken because I changed dcad's shortcuts with control keys to just the key by itself . For some reason they assigned the most often used commands with control key combinations. More evidence that programmers hate users.

 My main reason for mentioning those F keys was because they performed the display commands without opening dialog boxes.
 
But I always thought F6, 7 and 8 for wireframe, hide and shade came built-in because I can't remember assigning them myself.


Lar
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 07:22:40 AM by Lar »

Bob P

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2018, 08:18:49 AM »
Lar, et al,

You can run macros (even combined with the same "naked" shortcut key) at the command line (spacebar instigated) to run the same or even a different macro. It's only one extra keystroke.

Rob S

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2018, 09:21:30 AM »
All of above mostly limited by my capacity to remember all the shortcuts to the shortcuts....
User since Pro-design

corlett

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2018, 09:31:20 AM »
Hi Rob

Keyboard overlays, that's the key.

Clive

PS
DesignCAD is just the tool to draw them too.

Lar

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2018, 09:35:28 AM »
Bob,

Ae you saying I can type any of my default shortcuts in the command line to run the same command/macro. I just tried this with a few keys and got some unknown (or maybe just n-remembered) macros to run (I entered "0" {ie, zero} for Handle and "v" for line and got some strange macros. After entering "line" and getting the expected I entered "L" and got a not-remembered macro that looks like my style but must have been written ages ago).

I know you can enter the shortform of a command, or full names of some, but those shortforms I can't remember anymore. Plus, how do you enter F keys or control assisted keys?

I know I can edit those ini command files to add my own shortforms but all my energies go into maintaining my notorious "screen-full-of-toolboxes" system (2nd paragraph: http://forum.designcadcommunity.com/index.php?topic=7055.msg50713#msg50713). <<this actually turned out to be a good investment because I can use my toolboxes in modes that don't take custom shortcuts, like paper space and the block editor>>.


Lar

Rob S

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2018, 10:37:27 AM »
I recall there was a precedence that was used to determine what runs when you use the spacebar command line.  Did a quick search but can't find the official version right now

It goes something like if it finds a built in command with that name it runs it, if not it looks for aliases you have created and runs those, and if neither is found it then looks for macro names you have in your designated macro folder.

I don't think the command line responds to shortcut keys at all.
User since Pro-design

Bob P

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2018, 11:01:51 AM »
Bob,

Ae you saying I can type any of my default shortcuts in the command line to run the same command/macro. I just tried this with a few keys and got some unknown (or maybe just n-remembered) macros to run (I entered "0" {ie, zero} for Handle and "v" for line and got some strange macros. After entering "line" and getting the expected I entered "L" and got a not-remembered macro that looks like my style but must have been written ages ago).

I know you can enter the shortform of a command, or full names of some, but those shortforms I can't remember anymore. Plus, how do you enter F keys or control assisted keys?
Lar
You must save your macro with a new name, i.e. "x.d3m" in order to run it as a command-line "x" command. It will not conflict with the non-command line of the same name.

Lar

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2018, 11:58:21 AM »
Oh, yea. I do that now. But now I have to give my macros long descriptive names because I have so many of them. I usually only use the command line for such macros while I'm testing a new one, since I will be opening it so frequently right then. That macro name will remain on the list until it eventually gets bumped off, if I don't use it enough. If I remember it's there and use it enough it will stay on the list.

Other than that my main staples for the command line is mp for make plane and "trX" for whichever of the trim commands end on the list. I use to keep the list full (holds 20) but at some point the programmers took away the ability to hit a key to go to the next command starting with that letter, so my use of the command line was severely reduced (wouldn't want them to get rid of it, though).


Lar

Dr PR

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Re: Wire frame - Hide - Wire frame
« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2018, 09:35:55 AM »
For what it is worth, the CTRL key was the first addition to the normal typewriter keyboard. It appeared on Teletypes back in the 60s. One CTRL key was placed at the left side of the keyboard and was used primarily with the "Q" and "S" keys - because they were close to the CTRL key.

CTRL-Q (DC1 - XON or Device Control 1) and CTRL-S (DC3 - XOFF or Device Control 3) stopped and started a paper tape reader. Later these codes were embedded in ASCII data streams to start/stop whatever the programmer wanted started and stopped.

All keys on the keyboard could be used with the CTRL key. ASCII was just a series of alphanumeric and punctuation characters, so you could embed CTRL key codes in the data stream to cause things to happen at the receiving end of the message. For example, CTRL-G would ring the bell on the machine at the other end of the line to catch the operator's attention.

If you want to know more of this arcane bit of computer history look up:

www.baudot.net/docs/smith--teletype-codes.pdf

Personally, I have never found it an inconvenience to use the CTRL or ALT keys. On the other hand, if we didn't have them it would be a major inconvenience!

Phil
DesignCAD user since 1987