Author Topic: Yet Another 3D Viewer  (Read 11244 times)

bdeck

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Re: Yet Another 3D Viewer
« Reply #60 on: August 20, 2018, 10:31:50 AM »
Yes, GDI hidden line mode sucks.

I wonder if anyone has a nice brushed watercolor texture. That would certainly reduce the precision required when fitting vectors to images.

bd

Dr PR

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Re: Yet Another 3D Viewer
« Reply #61 on: August 20, 2018, 10:05:32 PM »
Lar,

I discovered something totally non-intuitive about the "Image/Save Image File" operation using "Smooth Shading." The resulting image file will be different if the screen image is wireframe, OpenGL Quick, OpenGL Gouraud, GDI Quick, GDI Gouraud or GDI Phong. So you have to select the proper screen rendering to get the best image file colors and contrasts. I think GDI Phong screen rendering gives the best image file colors and brightness range.

The Reference Manual says nothing about this! For years I could get only dull images in the image files because I normally work in wireframe or OpenGL Gouraud. One day I used Phong to check shadows before making an image file and the resulting image had much better color depth and contrast than what I normally got.

Of course when you work in wireframe or OpenGL Gouraud and have to switch to the much slower GDI Phong display every time you want to save an image file it wastes a lot of time, especially with large files that can take many minutes to render in Phong. PITA!

When you used GDI Phong or OpenGL Gouraud did you have "Enable Color Material" selected in the Phong shading dialog? If not only the base colors of objects will be displayed. If enabled the material colors are used.

Phil
DesignCAD user since 1987

Lar

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Re: Yet Another 3D Viewer
« Reply #62 on: August 21, 2018, 11:31:33 AM »
Phil,

OpenGL's "Quick" and "Gouraud" (Smooth) is what works best for me, and they actually look very good in "Mixed Mode" and then PDF'ed. For final renderings I would Gouraud, even though the mixed mode outlines would basically eliminate the "smoothness" difference between the two modes. Sometimes I hide most of the edges of a curved surface to get rid of that amateurish segmented look.

Only since mixed mode shading was introduced (this version, v2018...?...) have I been doing any dcad shading that would be shown to anyone other than myself (or this forum). Eg, I'm now considering using full color mixed mode images from dcad for final working drawing plots of 3D projects. Previously, anything colored for plots or presentations would be rendered in Cinema 4D. I once, many years ago, made the mistake of giving some of my working 3D shaded images (rendered in dcad) to a client who later had them printed as part of a billboard for a very prominent and highly controversial project and it just about destroyed my reputation as a 3D artist. Since then I have never given a dcad rendered image to a client.

For this reason I have only barely scratched the surface of dcad shading. Also, if the rendering is going to take a lot of manipulating to look like sense then I'll simply abort dcad's rendering and stick with C4D's. Problems I've had so far while using mixed mode shading is 1] surfaces parallel to the light render 100% black (solved by pointing lights inward along the neg. and pos. axes) and 2] rear views outline in the entity's color instead of black (solved, reluctantly,by rotating the entire model 180 deg. before rendering rear views). It takes a while to settle with these live-with-able solutions so if I encounter another then dcad's renderings may have to stay chained up in the basement.


Lar
« Last Edit: August 21, 2018, 11:36:47 AM by Lar »